Jul

7

The Scream

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(Norwegian: Skrik; created in 1893–1910) is the title of the expressionist painting and prints in a series by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch. It displays an agonized figure against a blood red sky. The landscape in the background is the Oslofjord, viewed from the hill of Ekeberg, in Oslo (then Kristiania), Norway.

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i thought that Norwegian Skrik made this painting that kind of confuses me 🙂

This is a good painting. Very creative indeed.

(Norwegian: Skrik; created in 1893–1910) is the title of the expressionist painting and prints in a series by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch. It displays an agonized figure against a blood red sky. The landscape in the background is the Oslofjord, viewed from the hill of Ekeberg, in Oslo (then Kristiania), Norway.

It depicts a screaming person standing on a bridge against a blood red sky. In the background you can see the Oslo fjord, viewed from the Ekeberg hill to the east of the city.

The Scream (Norwegian: Skrik; created in 1893–1910) is the title of expressionist paintings and prints in a series by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, showing an agonized figure against a blood red sky. The landscape in the background is the Oslofjord, viewed from the hill of Ekeberg, in Oslo (then Kristiania), Norway.Edvard Munch created several versions of The Scream in various media. The Munch Museum holds one of two painted versions (1910, see gallery) and one pastel. The National Gallery of Norway holds the other painted version (1893, shown to right). A fourth version, in pastel, is owned by Norwegian businessman Petter Olsen. Munch also created a lithograph of the image in 1895.The Scream has been the target of several high-profile art thefts. In 1994, the version in the National Gallery was stolen. It was recovered several months later. In 2004, The Scream and Madonna were stolen from the Munch Museum. Both paintings were recovered in 2006. They had sustained some damage and went back on display in May 2008, after undergoing restoration.

The area at St. Hanshaugen was a scrap heap and viewed as a useless area until the celebration of summer solstice (St. Hans in Norwegian) was moved there some time before 1820. The businessman Fritz Heinrich Frølich initiated a park there around 1850, got his will after much initial resistance and paid for the first works. In the middle of the 1860s Christiania Byes Vel was involved with the new park, planted 1275 trees and helped create the first major park outside the city center. From 1867 the city took responsibility for the park and the last major works were carried out in the years 1876–1890. The final part of the park was added with purchases of land in 1909. St. Hanshaugen had its heyday as an attraction from 1890 to the First World War. It is a classic city park where terrain, vegetation and water is used. The mixture of intimate and romantic areas in the south with more plain areas in the northern part, fabulous views, entertainment, a good restaurant (Hasselbakken), animals (birds and bears in a cage) all added to making the park popular.

The Scream (Norwegian: Skrik; created in 1893–1910) is the title of expressionist paintings and prints in a series by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, showing an agonized figure against a blood red sky. The landscape in the background is the Oslofjord, viewed from the hill of Ekeberg, in Oslo (then Kristiania), Norway.Edvard Munch created several versions of The Scream in various media. The Munch Museum holds one of two painted versions (1910, see gallery) and one pastel. The National Gallery of Norway holds the other painted version (1893, shown to right). A fourth version, in pastel, is owned by Norwegian businessman Petter Olsen. Munch also created a lithograph of the image in 1895.The Scream has been the target of several high-profile art thefts. In 1994, the version in the National Gallery was stolen. It was recovered several months later. In 2004, The Scream and Madonna were stolen from the Munch Museum. Both paintings were recovered in 2006. They had sustained some damage and went back on display in May 2008, after undergoing restoration.

The original German title given to the work by Munch is, Der Schrei der Natur (The Scream of Nature). The Norwegian word skrik usually is translated as scream, but is cognate with the English shriek . Occasionally, the painting also has been called, The Cry.

Thanks for finally writing about > Edvard Munch? The Scream < Loved it!

The Scream, created in 1893–1910 is the title of expressionist paintings and prints in a series by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, showing an agonized figure against a blood red sky. The landscape in the background is Oslofjord, viewed from the hill of Ekeberg, in Oslo (then Kristiania), Norway.

In addition, some scientists say there is a natural phenomenon that occasionally turns the sky over Oslo somewhat red, and that, is is thought, what gave Munch a panic attack.

The paintings feature an agonised figure who wails against a blood red skyline. It is a seminal expressionist painting by the Norwegian artist. It is said by some to symbolise modern man taken by an attack of existential angst. The landscape in the background is a place called Oslofjord, viewed from the hill of Ekeberg. Its real title is ‘Skirk’ which is Norwegian and is usually translated as ‘scream’, correctly however it is more likely to be English for ‘shriek.’ Occasionally, the painting has also been called The Cry.

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The paintings feature an agonised figure who wails against a blood red skyline. It is a seminal expressionist painting by the Norwegian artist. It is said by some to symbolise modern man taken by an attack of existential angst. The landscape in the background is a place called Oslofjord, viewed from the hill of Ekeberg. Its real title is ‘Skirk’ which is Norwegian and is usually translated as ‘scream’, correctly however it is more likely to be English for ‘shriek.’ Occasionally, the painting has also been called The Cry.

The original German title given to the work by Munch is Der Schrei der Natur (“The Scream of Nature”). The Norwegian word skrik usually is translated as scream, but is cognate with the English shriek . Occasionally, the painting also has been called The Cry.

The Scream (Norwegian: Skrik; created in 1893–1910) is the title of expressionist paintings and prints in a series by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, showing an agonized figure against a blood red sky. The landscape in the background is the Oslofjord, viewed from the hill of Ekeberg, in Oslo (then Kristiania), Norway.Edvard Munch created several versions of The Scream in various media. The Munch Museum holds one of two painted versions (1910, see gallery) and one pastel. The National Gallery of Norway holds the other painted version (1893, shown to right). A fourth version, in pastel, is owned by Norwegian businessman Petter Olsen. Munch also created a lithograph of the image in 1895.The Scream has been the target of several high-profile art thefts. In 1994, the version in the National Gallery was stolen. It was recovered several months later. In 2004, The Scream and Madonna were stolen from the Munch Museum. Both paintings were recovered in 2006. They had sustained some damage and went back on display in May 2008, after undergoing restoration.

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