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19

The Madonna

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Madonna is a famous painting by the Norwegian expressionist Edvard Munch. Munch painted five versions of the Madonna between 1894 and 1895, using oils on canvas. One of them measures 91 x 70.5 cm.

One version belonging to the Munch Museum of Oslo is stolen, while another is owned by businessman Nelson Blitz.

The title suggests a depiction of Mary, the mother of Jesus, although it is a highly unusual representation of Mary, who until the 20th century was usually represented in high art as a chaste, mature woman. The figure in this painting appears to be young, perhaps a teenager, and is sensualized, if not eroticized, by her twisting, expressive pose. She stretches her arms behind herself and arches her back, increasing the viewer’s consciousness of her physical body. Yet even in this unusual pose, she embodies some of the key elements of canonical representations of the Virgin: she has a quietness and a calm confidence about her. Her eyes are closed, expressing modesty, but she is simultaneously lit from above; her body is seen, in fact, twisting toward the light so as to catch more of it, even while she does not face it with her eyes. These elements suggest aspects of conventional representations of the Annunciation.



On Sunday, 22 August 2004, Madonna was stolen from the Munch Museum, Oslo (along with the famous painting The Scream, also by Munch), by masked men wielding firearms. The robbers forced the museum guards to lie down on the floor while they snapped the cable securing the paintings to the wall and escaped in a black Audi A6 station wagon, which police later found abandoned.

14 Responses so far

Sad news. Should have better security in that museum!

[…] Munch Art History, 2011, [available at] http://www.edvardmunch.info/paintings/madonna/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:LikeBe the first to like this post. Filed under CATS | Leave […]

The Bruges Madonna also has a similar story. It was very different for its time, being the only Michelangelo work that went outside Italy at that time. Many misfortunes happened to it during history but it eventually found its way back. Hopefully the same will happen also for this Madonna

You made some decent points there. I looked on the internet for the issue and found most individuals will go along with with your website. http://www.edvardmunch.info is really good.

The museum now has in its permanent collection well over half of the artist’s entire production of paintings and at least one copy of all his prints. This amounts to over 1,200 paintings, 18,000 prints, six sculptures, as well as 500 plates, 2,240 books, and various other items. The museum also contains educational and conservation sections and also has facilities for performing arts.

Edvard Munch (1863–1944) fans won’t want to miss the Munch Museum, which is dedicated to his life’s work and has most of the pieces not contained in the National Gallery. Security is high in the museum since the 2004 theft of The Scream and The Madonna, though both paintings were recovered in 2006. The museum provides a comprehensive look at the artist’s work, from dark (The Sick Child) to light (Spring Ploughing). With over 11,000 paintings, 4500 watercolours and 18,000 prints and sketching books bequeathed to the city by Munch himself, this is a landmark collection. To get there, take the T-bane to Tøyen, followed by a five-minute signposted walk.

A popular attraction for art lovers the world over, the Munch Museum showcases the life and works of the famous Norwegian artist Edvard Munch. Located just a 20-minute walk away from the Munch Museum and close to many of the city’s main attractions – the Radisson Blu Plaza Hotel, Oslo is a popular hotel for holidaymakers in Norway’s capital. With modern stylish rooms, one of the highest-rated Oslo restaurants and a fully equipped fitness centre and spa, the hotel is one of the best places to stay in Oslo. Visiting the Munch Museum Edvard Munch is perhaps most famous for his painting ‘The Scream’, and is considered a pioneer in the expressionist style. The Munch Museum has been set up in his memory and features paintings and sketches left to the city of Oslo by the artist himself. The museum features a permanent documentary exhibition and audio tours conducted in both English and Norwegian. ‘The Scream’ and Munch’s popular painting ‘The Madonna’ are on display, along with over 11,000 additional paintings, including 4,500 watercolours, plus 18,000 prints and sketchbooks. Enjoy the Munch Museum from the Radisson Blu Plaza Hotel, Oslo The Radisson Blu Plaza Hotel, Oslo is the perfect place to return after exploring the Munch Museum and the city’s fascinating attractions. Relax in top-quality Oslo accommodation , and enjoy the hotel’s fine dining, cosmopolitan bars and fully-equipped fitness centre. Book your Oslo visit today.

Edvard Munch (1863–1944) fans won’t want to miss the Munch Museum, which is dedicated to his life’s work and has most of the pieces not contained in the National Gallery. Security is high in the museum since the 2004 theft of The Scream and The Madonna, though both paintings were recovered in 2006. The museum provides a comprehensive look at the artist’s work, from dark (The Sick Child) to light (Spring Ploughing). With over 11,000 paintings, 4500 watercolours and 18,000 prints and sketching books bequeathed to the city by Munch himself, this is a landmark collection. To get there, take the T-bane to Tøyen, followed by a five-minute signposted walk.

When Munch died in January 1944, it transpired that he had unconditionally bequeathed all his remaining works to the City of Oslo. Edvard Munch’s art is the most significant Norwegian contribution to the history of art, and he is the only Norwegian artist who has exercised a decisive influence on European art trends, above all as a pioneer of Expressionism in Germany and the Nordic countries. The Munch Museum opened in 1963 and was purpose-built to house this unique collection of approximately 1100 paintings, 4500 drawings and 18 000 prints. Major works will always be on display in the museum. The selection is changed regularly. In 1994, expansion and rehabilitation of the museum was financed by the Japanese company Idemitsu Kosan Ltd. The museum was partly rebuilt in 2005 to upgrade security. The museum’s programme also comprises film screenings, audioguides, concerts, guided tours and lectures. The Munch Museum offers spaces for a wide range of events.The lecture/concert hall has 300 seats, a piano and a small stage. This hall is currently undergoing a complete renovation. Munch’s monumental paintings “The Sun” and “Alma Mater” are on display in the hall. The auditorium/filmroom has 35 seats and the meeting room has approximately 12 seats. The areas may be hired separately or together.

The Munch Museum opened in 1963 and was purpose-built to house this unique collection of approximately 1100 paintings, 4500 drawings and 18 000 prints. Major works will always be on display in the museum. The selection is changed regularly. In 1994, expansion and rehabilitation of the museum was financed by the Japanese company Idemitsu Kosan Ltd. The museum was partly rebuilt in 2005 to upgrade security.

The Munch Museum preserves the remaining art works of Edvard Munch, which he bequeathed to the City of Oslo in 1944: a collection of approximately 1100 paintings, 4500 drawings and 18 000 prints.

When Munch died in January 1944, it transpired that he had unconditionally bequeathed all his remaining works to the City of Oslo. Edvard Munch’s art is the most significant Norwegian contribution to the history of art, and he is the only Norwegian artist who has exercised a decisive influence on European art trends, above all as a pioneer of Expressionism in Germany and the Nordic countries. The Munch Museum opened in 1963 and was purpose-built to house this unique collection of approximately 1100 paintings, 4500 drawings and 18 000 prints. Major works will always be on display in the museum. The selection is changed regularly. In 1994, expansion and rehabilitation of the museum was financed by the Japanese company Idemitsu Kosan Ltd. The museum was partly rebuilt in 2005 to upgrade security. The museum’s programme also comprises film screenings, audioguides, concerts, guided tours and lectures. The museum has a shop with catalogues and souvenirs and a café that serves salads, pastries, sandwiches etc. The museum’s library houses literature on Edvard Munch and other artists.

When Munch died in January 1944, it transpired that he had unconditionally bequeathed all his remaining works to the City of Oslo. Edvard Munch’s art is the most significant Norwegian contribution to the history of art, and he is the only Norwegian artist who has exercised a decisive influence on European art trends, above all as a pioneer of Expressionism in Germany and the Nordic countries. The Munch Museum opened in 1963 and was purpose-built to house this unique collection of approximately 1100 paintings, 4500 drawings and 18 000 prints. Major works will always be on display in the museum. The selection is changed regularly. In 1994, expansion and rehabilitation of the museum was financed by the Japanese company Idemitsu Kosan Ltd. The museum was partly rebuilt in 2005 to upgrade security. The museum’s programme also comprises film screenings, audioguides, concerts, guided tours and lectures. The museum has a shop with catalogues and souvenirs and a café that serves salads, pastries, sandwiches etc. The museum’s library houses literature on Edvard Munch and other artists.

Museum of Fine Arts in Bilbao Opens Exhibition Dedicated to Novecentismo and Avant-Garde Novecentismo and Avant-Garde (1910-1936) in Bilbao Fine Arts Museum Collection2 March – 24 May, 2009After Basque Artists and From Goya to Gauguin, held in 2008 to shed fresh light on certain sections of the Museum collection, The Novecento and the Early Avant-garde now presents 149 works from the early 20th-century, in a selection of paintings, sculptures, exhibition posters and photographs by professor Eugenio Carmona. The early decades of the last century were crucial to developments in contemporary Spanish art, which is so well represented in the Museum collection. At the beginning of the century, the idea of the modern covered a broad spectrum of sensibilities, ranging from what was known as novecentismo (the novecento, i.e. the nineteen hundreds), which sought to create a refined art, almost classical in its restraint, to the avant-garde, most often identified with Cubism and Futurism. At the same time, the legacy of Symbolism and Impressionism continued to influence artists. In this context, a number of Basque artists tried to redefine the sense of local identity and the vernacular.Joaquín Torres García, Joaquim Sunyer, Aurelio Arteta, Daniel Vázquez Díaz, Julián de Tellaeche, Antonio de Guezala, Celso Lagar, Gabriel García Maroto and Jose María de Ucelay are some of the leading artists represented here.

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